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SOUTH KOREA PASSES HISTORIC LAW TO BAN THE DOG MEAT TRADE

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Members of parliament in South Korea have supported a new law that outlaws the trade in dog meat, making it unlawful to kill and sell animals for their meat.

The new law is expected to take effect by 2027, ending centuries of human consumption of dogs.

Dog meat is used in a stew known as “boshintang,” which is regarded as a delicacy by some older South Koreans but is losing favor with younger diners.

Eating dog meat will still be permitted even though the new law forbids killing and selling dogs for their meat.

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Animal activists have hailed the decision—which came about as a result of years of internal and international pressure—as a “historic victory.”

SOUTH KOREA DOG MEAT

SUPPORTERS OF THE DOG MEAT TRADE

The BBC reported that dog meat farmers had lobbied against the law, prompting complaints from some quarters regarding the prohibition.

The outlet reported that some claimed that because the trade is so popular with seniors, it should eventually disappear.

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On the other hand, some pointed out that since dog meat traders are typically older individuals, it might be harder for them to get a job at this point in their lives.

Talking to the BBC, one dog farmer, Joo Yeong-bong, said: “In 10 years, the industry would have disappeared.

“We’re in our 60s and 70s and now we have no choice but to lose our livelihood this is an infringement of people’s freedom to eat what they like”.

BOOKED IN HISTORY

Nonetheless, the majority of supporters of animal welfare are happy with the decision, while a tiny minority are disappointed to see the end of the dog meat trade.

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Chae Jung-ah, executive director of animal protection group Humane Society International Korea, said: “This is history in the making.

SOUTH KOREA DOG MEAT

“We have reached the tipping point where most Korean citizens reject eating dogs and want to see this suffering consigned to the history books and today our policymakers have acted decisively to make that a reality.”

He added: “While my heart breaks for all the millions of dogs for whom this change has come too late, I am overjoyed that South Korea can now close this miserable chapter in our history and embrace a dog-friendly future.”

In a poll conducted earlier this week, the Seoul-based think tank Animal Welfare Awareness, Research and Education revealed that 95% of participants said they had abstained from eating dog meat in the previous year and 93% said they would not do so going forward.  

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